Don’t Mess With Librarians. Period.
Via http://truth-out.org/news/item/9369-occupy-wall-street-librarians-strike-back
"Thursday, members of Occupy Wall Street took a step toward forcing the city of New York to reveal the facts of that night to the public, as they filed a federal lawsuit against the city, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and Sanitation Commissioner John Doherty, seeking to hold them accountable for violations of their constitutional rights in the course of the raid, as well as subsequent smaller raids that targeted the People’s Library - the movement’s most visible demonstration, through the collection and sharing of books in public spaces, of the rights to free speech and free assembly.
[…]
Months after the raid, the People’s Library still represents one of the more chilling chapters in the movement’s short history: the political repression of books and of those who curate them. Two librarians were arrested in the raid and others have been targeted for harassment and arrest simply for displaying books in the public parks when Occupy holds actions and other events in them. “This is why I was sleeping out in these parks all those nights in the first place,” said librarian Frances Mercanti-Anthony. “This kind of injustice.”“
Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nakrnsm/3509076374/sizes/o/in/photostream/

Don’t Mess With Librarians. Period.

Via http://truth-out.org/news/item/9369-occupy-wall-street-librarians-strike-back

"Thursday, members of Occupy Wall Street took a step toward forcing the city of New York to reveal the facts of that night to the public, as they filed a federal lawsuit against the city, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and Sanitation Commissioner John Doherty, seeking to hold them accountable for violations of their constitutional rights in the course of the raid, as well as subsequent smaller raids that targeted the People’s Library - the movement’s most visible demonstration, through the collection and sharing of books in public spaces, of the rights to free speech and free assembly.

[…]

Months after the raid, the People’s Library still represents one of the more chilling chapters in the movement’s short history: the political repression of books and of those who curate them. Two librarians were arrested in the raid and others have been targeted for harassment and arrest simply for displaying books in the public parks when Occupy holds actions and other events in them. “This is why I was sleeping out in these parks all those nights in the first place,” said librarian Frances Mercanti-Anthony. “This kind of injustice.”“

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nakrnsm/3509076374/sizes/o/in/photostream/

It’s hard to overstate how oppressive it is for the U.S. Government to be able to target journalists, film-makers and activists and, without a shred of suspicion of wrongdoing, learn the most private and intimate details about them and their work: with whom they’re communicating, what is being said, what they’re reading. That’s a radical power for a government to assert in general. When it starts being applied not randomly, but to people engaged in activism and journalism adverse to the government, it becomes worse than radical: it’s the power of intimidation and deterrence against those who would challenge government conduct in any way. The ongoing, and escalating, treatment of Laura Poitras is a testament to how severe that abuse is.

SOURCE: U.S. filmmaker repeatedly detained at border - Salon.com

Glenn Greenwald gives us a glimpse at another facet of the increasing encroachments on First Amendment freedoms that journalists are facing in the US.