Don’t Mess With Librarians. Period.
Via http://truth-out.org/news/item/9369-occupy-wall-street-librarians-strike-back
"Thursday, members of Occupy Wall Street took a step toward forcing the city of New York to reveal the facts of that night to the public, as they filed a federal lawsuit against the city, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and Sanitation Commissioner John Doherty, seeking to hold them accountable for violations of their constitutional rights in the course of the raid, as well as subsequent smaller raids that targeted the People’s Library - the movement’s most visible demonstration, through the collection and sharing of books in public spaces, of the rights to free speech and free assembly.
[…]
Months after the raid, the People’s Library still represents one of the more chilling chapters in the movement’s short history: the political repression of books and of those who curate them. Two librarians were arrested in the raid and others have been targeted for harassment and arrest simply for displaying books in the public parks when Occupy holds actions and other events in them. “This is why I was sleeping out in these parks all those nights in the first place,” said librarian Frances Mercanti-Anthony. “This kind of injustice.”“
Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nakrnsm/3509076374/sizes/o/in/photostream/

Don’t Mess With Librarians. Period.

Via http://truth-out.org/news/item/9369-occupy-wall-street-librarians-strike-back

"Thursday, members of Occupy Wall Street took a step toward forcing the city of New York to reveal the facts of that night to the public, as they filed a federal lawsuit against the city, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and Sanitation Commissioner John Doherty, seeking to hold them accountable for violations of their constitutional rights in the course of the raid, as well as subsequent smaller raids that targeted the People’s Library - the movement’s most visible demonstration, through the collection and sharing of books in public spaces, of the rights to free speech and free assembly.

[…]

Months after the raid, the People’s Library still represents one of the more chilling chapters in the movement’s short history: the political repression of books and of those who curate them. Two librarians were arrested in the raid and others have been targeted for harassment and arrest simply for displaying books in the public parks when Occupy holds actions and other events in them. “This is why I was sleeping out in these parks all those nights in the first place,” said librarian Frances Mercanti-Anthony. “This kind of injustice.”“

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nakrnsm/3509076374/sizes/o/in/photostream/

  1. jcstearns posted this